Ken Bova

 
Greenway (brooch), torch fired liquid white enamel on copper, Sterling silver, 14k gold, carnelian, 2 x 2.25inRed Badge (brooch), torch fired liquid white enamel on copper, Sterling silver, found red plastic, 2.25 x 2inScratch #7 (brooch), torch fired liquid white enamel on copper, Sterling silver,, 23k gold leaf, salmon moonstone, vintage floor tile fragment, 2 x 2.5inSpill (brooch), torch fired liquid white enamel on copper, Sterling silver, 18k gold, vintage floor tile fragment, 2 x 2.5in
Replay (sweater pin), Sterling silver, 23k gold leaf, 14k gold, butterfly wings, candy wrappers, acrylic, tempera paint, 4 x 1.25inTreasure Chest (sweater pin), Sterling silver, 23k gold leaf, butterfly wing, acrylic, rose quartz, candy wrappers, 2.75 x 1.5inPin Studies, Sterling silver and mixed media, each 1.5 x 1.5in squaresDaddy's Pride and Joy, 14k gold, 23k gold leaf, pressed flower (forget-me-not), family photo, mixed media assemblage, (Permanent Collection Tacoma Art Museum)
Scratch #3 (brooch), torch fired white liquid enamel, sterling, 14k gold, 2 x 2.5inScratch #6, (brooch), torch fired white liquid enamel, sterling, 14k gold. 2 x 2.5in
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Ken Bova is a Past President of the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) whose work is in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian, Racine, Tacoma, and Georgia Art Museums among others. He has presented workshops nationwide in such places as Haystack, Penland, Arrowmont, Idyllwild, and the John Campbell Folk school to name a few.

His work has been published in American Craft, Metalsmith, and Ornament magazines and in a variety of exhibition catalogs, books, and articles.

Bova taught for more than 20 years in the Jewelry/Metals program at Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana. While in Montana he received a Montana Arts Council Fellowship, two MSU Alumni Association Excellence in Teaching Awards, and two artists residencies, at the Fundacion Valparaiso in Mojacar, Spain and the Jentel Foundation in Banner, Wyoming.

In 2010 he accepted a position at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina, where he teaches enameling, senior studio courses, and is Area Coordinator of the graduate program in Metal Design

STATEMENT:
When I was a kid I used to take the seeds from mimosa pods and string them with a needle and thread into long heishi-like strands for necklaces. I kept them in cigar boxes, along with bits of colored paper, drawings, feathers, small bones, stones, colored shards of glass, and treasure maps that I drew myself ~ relics of an imaginative and active childhood.

In addition to art, I studied philosophy and religious studies in graduate school with the wonder-full Dr. Lynda Sexson. In her book “Ordinarily Sacred” she says that inventories of children’s treasures and those of religious holy places are remarkably similar; that the “junk” that’s precious to kids, and adults, is the stuff of the sacred.

She writes, “The sacred, when not bound by politics and economics, is nearer to something we call the aesthetic.”

My work is, in part, the result of this heritage. It seeks to convey my fascination with narrative, color and line, objects of intimacy, elements of the landscape both external and internal, and the wonder of small things that attract my attention. It is about mapping the treasures in my life. It is about precious junk becoming sacred, becoming aesthetic.

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